Editorial Board

 

The following scholars and academics have provided feedback, advice and written content for Indigenous Histories and Cultures in North America, for which we are very grateful:

 

Ned Blackhawk, Yale University

Ned Blackhawk (Western Shoshone) is a Professor of History and American Studies at Yale and was on the faculty from 1999 to 2009 at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. A graduate of McGill University, he holds graduate degrees in History from UCLA and the University of Washington and has been presented with several awards including the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize from the Organization of American Historians. Ned has provided valuable advice on various areas throughout the publication process including the Tribes and Nations list.

 

Brenda Child, University of Minnesota

Brenda Child is on the faculty at the University of Minnesota, specialising in American Indian history, multiculturalism and native culture. Graduating in History and Social Sciences from Bemidji State University she then went on to study History at the University of Iowa, gaining an MA and PhD before publishing several works on the subject of American Indian boarding schools. Brenda has provided an essay on American Indian boarding schools and education for Indigenous Histories and Cultures in North America.

 

Will Gosner, Independent Researcher

Will Gosner is an independent researcher and writer living in Chicago, Illinois. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2010 with a bachelor's degree in history and subsequently worked in the Newberry Library's Hermon Dunlap Smith Center for the History of Cartography until 2013. Will has undertaken extensive research to write the Chronology as well as compiling data and writing copy for the Maps feature.

 

Rebecca Horn, University of Utah

Rebecca Horn is the Director of Latin American Studies and Associate Professor at the University of Utah. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley with a degree in History before going on to achieve an MA and PhD in the subject from the University of California, Los Angeles. She has authored several notable publications specializing in the regions of Latin America, the Caribbean and Mexico. Rebecca has provided an essay on Mexican Indigenous manuscripts and historiography for Indigenous Histories and Cultures in North America.

 

Brian Hosmer, University of Tulsa

Brian Hosmer is the H. G. Barnard Associate Professor of Western American History at the University of Tulsa. He had previously taught in the History Department at the University of Illinois, Chicago where he also held the position of Director of the Newberry Library's D'Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian History. Brian has provided valuable advice on various areas throughout the publication process including the Tribes and Nations list.

 

Jean O’Brien, University of Minnesota

Jean O'Brien is a professor in the Department of History at the University of Minnesota. Academically, she specializes in: Native American representations, State and Federal recognition, Indians of the Northeast, ethnohistory and U.S. colonial history and has published widely in this area. Jean gained her PhD in History from the University of Chicago. Jean has provided valuable advice on various areas throughout the publication process including the Tribes and Nations list.

 

Kathryn Shanley, University of Montana

Kathryn Shanley currently serves as Special Assistant to the Provost for Native American and Indigenous Education at the University of Montana and has been the president of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association as well as previously occupying a position on the Board of Directors at the American Indian Graduate Center. Her research interests lie with Native American literature, religion, philosophy and women in Native America and she has a PhD in English Literature and Language from the University of Michigan. Kate has provided valuable advice on various areas throughout the publication process including the Tribes and Nations list.

 

David Silverman, George Washington University

David J. Silverman teaches Early American and American Indian history. He has published widely on Native America, religion and colonialism; among his honors are the 2008 Douglass Adair Memorial Award and the 2006 Lester J. Cappon Award from the William and Mary Quarterly. He received his doctorate from Princeton in 2000. David has provided an essay on Indians at the Center of Colonial American History for Indigenous Histories and Cultures in North America.

 

Scott Mannning Stevens, D'Arcy McNickle Center at the Newberry Library

Scott Manning Stevens is the Director of the Newberry’s D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies and a member of the Akwesasne Mohawk Nation. Since receiving his Ph.D. in English from Harvard University, Scott's research interests have revolved around the diplomatic and cultural strategies of resistance among North American Indians in the face of European and American settler colonialism, as well as the political and aesthetic issues that surround museums and the indigenous cultures they put on display. 

Scott also helped throughout the project development, offering advice on themes, items to include and ways of organising the material. He has supplied an introductory essay to the Edward E. Ayer Collection at the Newberry Library for Indigenous Histories and Cultures in North America.

 

Joyce Szabo, University of New Mexico

Joyce M. Szabo is an art historian specializing in Native American art and related courses in Museum Studies at the University of New Mexico. She obtained her undergraduate degree in Art and English from Wittenberg University, her MA in Art History from Vanderbilt University, and her PhD in Art History from the University of New Mexico. Her area of particular focus is Plains drawing and painting from the late nineteenth to the early twentieth century, although she has published on other aspects of Native American art, including contemporary artists, as well as American art in general. Joyce has provided an essay on ledger art for Indigenous Histories and Cultures in North America.

 

William Treuttner, Smithsonian American Art Museum

William Truettner has been a curator of painting and sculpture at the Smithsonian American Art Museum since 1965. His research interests include eighteenth and nineteenth century American painting, George Catlin and art of the American West. Truettner holds a bachelor’s degree from Williams College and a master’s degree in art history from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He has provided an essay on the art in the Newberry collections for Indigenous Histories and Cultures in North America.

 

Robert Warrior, University of Illinois

Robert Warrior is Director of American Indian Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he is Professor of American Indian Studies, English and History. An enrolled member of the Osage Nation, his teaching spans a wide range of disciplines and specialities, including intellectual history, American literature, social movements, history, theory, and comparative indigeneity. Robert gained a BA in Speech Communication (Pepperdine University), an MA in Religion from Yale and a PhD from Union Theological Seminary before going on to become the founding President of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association.

 

David Wilkins, University of Richmond

David E. Wilkins is E. Claiborne Robins Distinguished Professor in Leadership Studies at the University of Richmond. Prior to this he held the McKnight Presidential Professorship in American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota where he had adjunct appointments in Political Science, Law, and American Studies. He received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of North Carolina/Chapel Hill and his research and teaching interests include indigenous politics and governance, federal Indigenous policy and law, comparative politics, and diplomacy and constitutional development. David has provided an essay on the relationship between Indigenous Peoples and the American Government for Indigenous Histories and Cultures in North America.